Woman Pleads for Vaccination after Losing COVID Vaccine-Hesitant Husband

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Playing Meet Woman Who Lost Her Vaccine-Hesitant Husband to COVID

The Doctors are joined by Brittany, who lost her husband Brad to COVID-19. She pleads with those who are vaccine-hesitant to get the shot and hopefully avoid the tragedy her husband suffered.

Brittany explains she and her husband were both dealing with preexisting conditions -- like diabetes and high blood pressure -- and were hesitant to get the vaccine. She and her husband were worried about potential side effects. When they both became infected with the virus, Brad's health quickly declined and after a few days, he was hospitalized with pneumonia and eventually died.

Despite her initial hesitation, Brittany did get vaccinated after her sister -- who is a nurse -- convinced her to get her shot, which may have saved her life. Though she become infected with the virus, she was told by a doctor that just having her first shot likely kept many of her symptoms from becoming severe and prevented her from being hospitalized like her husband.

She sends a message to others who have yet to get vaccinated, urging everyone eligible to get the shot. "Take my story and take the loss of my husband [as inspiration] to not wind up like me. Get the vaccine," she tells The Doctors, saying she feels if Brad had decided to get the vaccine, he may still be alive. 

Critical care physician Dr. Denyse Lutchmansingh, the associate director of post-COVID care at Yale Medicine, says she has seen numerous patients like Brad -- who are not vaccinated and dealing with preexisting conditions -- end up hospitalized and she warns many of these patients' health will often deteriorate quickly.

"The patients who [are vaccinated] and contract COVID are not as ill as though those who are unvaccinated. The outcomes are significantly different," Dr. Lutchmansingh says.

She goes on to explain that most medical experts believe people with lung disease, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and a history of smoking deal with a more severe version of the disease due to having an increased number of a specific type of receptor that is an entry point for the virus. This can lead to a higher risk for infection and then a more severe case of COVID.

The Doctors stress getting vaccinated -- especially if you are dealing with preexisting conditions -- is the best defense against COVID. 

Find out where to get your free COVID-19 vaccine, here or search vaccines.gov, text your ZIP code to 438829, or call 1-800-232-0233 to find locations near you in the U.S.

Watch: Woman’s Unvaccinated Husband Died a Week after Heading to the Hospital

Watch: Are These Homemade Remedies a Must or a Bust?

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Playing Why Do Pre-Existing Conditions Make COVID-19 Worse?

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