Team of Doctors Help Aaron Carter’s Mom Jane with Health Issues

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Playing Aaron Carter’s Mom Jane Searches for Answers to Her Health Issues

The Doctors share an update on Aaron Cater's mom, Jane, who came to the show with her pop star son and Jane also revealed she was looking for help with her health issues related to alcohol abuse.

Watch: Aaron Carter Comes Clean about His Addiction to Huffing

Earlier this season, Jane revealed she drinks excessively most days and says it has affected her relationships and her health. "I really don't wanna die. I want to be there for everybody. I want to be there for my grandchildren," she said at the time. She sought treatment at Ocean Hills Recovery along with seeing a team of doctors, including dentist Dr. Bill Dorfman for dental issues, pulmonologist Dr. Avi Ishaaya for her sleep apnea and breathing issues, and gastroenterologist Dr. Jorge Rodriguez, who saw Jane to determine the cause of her a chronic cough and why she's throwing up blood at times.

Dr. Dorfman says Jane's drinking has caused her cavities, along with nighttime teeth grinding. Dr. Ishaaya determined she suffered from severe sleep apnea, and says if left untreated, could possibly take her life. Dr. Rodriguez found inflammation and bacteria H pylori in Jane’s system, which predisposes someone to ulcers or gastritis. Dr. Rodriguez says this is treatable, but not while someone is currently drinking alcohol. 

Watch: Why Does Aaron Carter Own So Many Guns?

The Doctors share that Jane was in treatment for 2 months and checked herself out of the facility against her doctor's orders. She declined to appear on the show. Clinical psychologist Dr. Judy Ho notes the road to sobriety and treating addiction can be very difficult and says 40 to 60 percent of people are not successful in their first year. She encourages anyone struggling to persist and do the work necessary.

"Jane, if you are watching, we're thinking of you and we wish you nothing but the best on your journey for sobriety," ER physician Dr. Travis Stork adds.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction please call the confidential and free National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP or visit their website.
 

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