Still Vaping? Protect Yourself from This Unsafe Vape Liquid!

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Playing New Evidence Sheds Light on Vaping Deaths

The Doctors examine the health issues related to vaping cannabis and discuss how the CDC has found the cutting agent vitamin E acetate has been linked to illness and death. We are joined by pediatric pulmonologist Dr. Eric Hamberger, cannabis expert Sherry Yafai, and president of Cannasafe Laboratory Aaron Riley to discuss how to protect yourself from unsafe vape ingredients. 

Watch: Stopping Dangerous Vape Ingredients from Being Used

The cutting agent, found in black market vape cartridges, is used to reduce the amount of THC in a vape cartridge and increases profits.  The current theory is that the cutting agent is causing damage to the air sacs of the lungs.

The panel warns that many of these black market products are designed to deceive consumers, who might think they are getting a licensed product. Additionally, unsafe pesticides have been found in black market cannabis vape products.

Watch: Did Vaping Cause Teens Lung to Collapse?

The panel stresses consumers should only buy products from a licensed dispensary. They also note a licensed product could be anywhere from 45 to 100 dollars at a dispensary whereas the black market product will be around $10 dollars. Due to the possible health concerns of vaping, Sherry feels the safest way to consume cannabis is flower consumption in order to see what you are getting. She says to avoid all oil-based vaping products until the problems with vitamin E acetate have been resolved.

Find out what the cannabis expert feels is the safest delivery method (like inhalers, steroid pills, steroid inhalers, flowers, oils, sublinguals, or edibles) for cannabis in the video below.

The Doctors note that cannabis can be beneficial for certain patients and people, but warn it can be abused and has risks when not used appropriately. When in doubt, speak with your doctor about your cannabis use.

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