Millennials Are Dying Younger Than Previous Generations?

This video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.

If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.
Playing Why Are Millennials Broke, Sick, and Dying Younger?

Millennials might be perceived as loving most things related to health and wellness, but according to a new report, this generation is potentially going to be more broke, sick and die younger than other generations. Doctors' Investigative reporter Leslie Marcus gathers a group of millennials to better understand these alarming findings.

Watch: Why Millennials Are in Financial Straits

We speak with 5 different millennials (4 are self-employed, 4 have debt, 3 have health insurance) and all of them share they have encountered financial hurdles regarding their type of insurance or lack of insurance. Leslie notes the study found this generation's health starts to decline at the average age of 27, much earlier than previous generations, which is reportedly due to psychical and behavioral health factors (stress, anxiety, and depression). Leslie found that many of the people she spoke with did not have therapy covered by their insurance. She also found that some declined their company-issued insurance in order to pay for things like a gym membership, which could easily have an adverse effect on one's long-term health.

Millennial therapist Tess Brigham joins the conversation and adds that she recommends for people who are struggling to find a sense of self or purpose that they need to look inside and tune out the white noise of the outside world and also the false narratives created by social media. She explains that for many millennials, the idea of working on a long-term goal that may take years and years to accomplish was not instilled in their generation, which she feels has to lead to some struggling. 

Watch: Financial Expert's Best Tips for Millennials

Learn more about the looming health crisis for this generation with financial expert Stefanie O’Connell, including tips for people without insurance and how they can access health resources.

This video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.

If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.