How to Spot Melanoma before It Becomes Life-Threatening

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Playing How to Spot Skin Cancer Before It Is Too Late

The Doctors are joined by Rachel, who shares she believed she had a plantar wart but discovered it was actually something more alarming.

When her issue persisted, she went to a dermatologist and was told it was melanoma, and unfortunately, it had spread to lymph nodes and her stomach lining. She underwent several surgeries to remove the melanoma and reconstructive surgery to repair her foot.

Watch: Apricot Seed Cancer 'Cure' Can Be Fatal?

Rachel is happy to tell The Doctors she is doing "really well now" and her latest scan came back showing no signs of cancer. She notes she will continue to need to be checked as melanoma can return. She is currently getting immunotherapy every four weeks to keep the cancer at bay.

Oncologist Dr. Lawrence Piro explains that immunotherapy helps to fight and kill cancer cells in a way that chemotherapy cannot. 

Dr. Piro notes that melanoma can often look like a dark or black spot or even a wart, and can occur in places not exposed to the sun. He says that anything that doesn't seem it should be on your skin should be checked out by a dermatologist.

Watch: What to Do After a Cancer Diagnosis

Dermatologist Dr. Sonia Batra adds that if something on your skin is there for longer than a month or appears as sore but is not healing to see a skin specialist. 

Help Rachel fundraise for cancer research, here!

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