How Sobriety Transformed Author Laura Mckowen's Life

This video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.

If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.
Playing How Author Laura Mckowen Found the Magic in Getting Sober

The Doctors welcome author Laura McKowen who is working to remove the stigma, secrecy, and shame of recovery.

Watch: Mom with Picture-Perfect Life Reveals Her Secret Addiction

The  “We Are the Luckiest: The Surprising Magic of a Sober Life" author says she first thought having to give up drinking and being labeled an "addict" would be horrible, but 30 days into her sobriety during a quiet time at home with her daughter, she realized this was the thing she had always wanted. Laura says she then realized she was lucky to be an addict and began sharing this idea on social media.

Watch: How Mom Took Control of Her Decades-Long Addiction Struggle

During recovery, Laura tells Dr. Ian Smith she has to learn how to really tell the truth, something she feels was one of the most humbling learning experiences in her life.

Do you have someone in your life dealing with addiction? The author shares helpful things to share with this person in need:

  1. It is not your fault.
  2. It is your responsibility.
  3. It is unfair that this is your thing.
  4. This is your thing.
  5. This will never stop being your thing until you face it.
  6. You can’t do it alone.
  7. Only you can do it.
  8. You are loved.
  9. We will never stop reminding you of these things.  

Get more insight into recovery from Laura in an excerpt from “We Are the Luckiest: The Surprising Magic of a Sober Life":

"Maybe you’re trying to get sober. Or maybe you’re at the end of a relationship, or someone you love has passed, or you’re making a huge professional leap, or a season of your life is coming to an end or already has. Whether it’s something that you’ve chosen or something that has befallen you, the result is the same: you are going to have to build a new way of being. That can sound clear and linear, like something that can be project-managed, but real transformation doesn’t work that way. My friend Lisa says, 'Getting sober ain’t like other task-oriented activities, sweetie,' and this is hilariously, and unfortunately, true. It’s bigger. Wider. Deeper. Entirely engrossing. Otherworldly, even."

 

This video is unavailable because we were unable to load a message from our sponsors.

If you are using ad-blocking software, please disable it and reload the page.

 

Sign up for Our Newsletter!

*CBSi may earn an affiliate commission if you purchase something through featured links above.