How Hormone Therapy Can Help You Feel More like Yourself and Less Anxious

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Playing Can Hormone Therapy Help You Thrive during Menopause?

Could hormone therapy be the answer to your menopause-related symptoms?

Karyn tells The Doctors she began experiencing hot flashes, panic attacks, serious mental fog and her usual zest for life began to disappear. She sought treatment from anti-aging and regenerative medicine specialist Dr. Christopher Asandra, who did a blood test on her. Dr. Asandra discovered her hormones were out of whack and that she was in menopause.

He suggested she begin hormone therapy in the form of an implant of estrogen and testosterone pellets, which was placed under the skin in her butt. Karyn says she did not feel anything during the implant procedure and still can't even tell where the pellets are placed. Another bonus about the implant is not having to take a pill every day. Karyn is also taking progesterone at night. 

"It's only been 2 weeks, and I'm already feeling so much better," Karyn says, explaining she has decreased anxiety and the mental fog is lifting. "I feel like my old self more and more every day." 

She says she also feels a sense of relief since starting the hormone therapy. "It's easier to be in my body. I don't feel fatigued. I feel comfortable,"  Karyn adds, explaining she is sleeping better and waking up feeling ready to conquer the day.

Dr. Asandra explains the implant hormone therapy involves a tiny incision in the hip or buttock area, where the pellets are placed under the skin. They release hormones continuously and last around 3 to 4 months. 

If a woman's hormone levels are too low, Dr. Asandra says they are at a higher risk for osteoporosis and a loss of muscle mass. If too much estrogen is administered issues like vaginal bleeding, enlarged breasts, and storing more fat on the body can occur. Too much testosterone can lead to hair growth, acne, clitoral enlargement, and increased libido.

To avoid these issues, Dr. Asandra tests and monitors a patients' blood at least 4 times a year after beginning hormone therapy to ensure their levels stay in check. 

"Every woman is going to go through this. Your symptoms will be different, but there is help and you don't have to suffer," Karyn says, encouraging other women dealing with similar menopause-related symptoms to seek out help.

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Playing What Are the Potential Risks to Hormone Therapy for Menopause

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