Are Powder-Based Beauty Products Dangerous?

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Playing What Does the Baby Powder Recall Mean for You?

While discussing the recall of 33,000 bottles of baby powder by Johnson and Johnson over concerns of asbestos contamination, The Doctors warn talc and talcum powder is found in many items, not only baby powder, like beauty products and share how to find safer options.

Watch: Is There Asbestos-Laced Talc in Your Favorite Beauty Products?

There have been more than 10,000 lawsuits attempting to link asbestos-tainted talc powder with cancer and a study found strong evidence that asbestos-tainted talc powder may even lead to mesothelioma, which can attack the lining and tissue of internal organs. Trial lawyer Mark Lanier details why asbestos is so dangerous and explains it can change our body on a cellular level. He alleges that 2 out of 3 bottles of Johnson and Johnson baby powder contains asbestos and that the company was aware of this and even knew how to test for it and mislead the public and government.

He warns that talc powder (which can easily contain traces of asbestos) is not just in baby powder, but also in products like medicated foot powders and powder-based makeup.

"You don't want to use talc or expose yourself, your children or your loved ones," he says, explaining there are brands of makeup that are talc-free and urges consumers to buy these types.

Watch: Is Baby Powder Linked to Mesothelioma?

Occupational medicine specialist Dr. Jacqueline Moline urges viewers that going forward to always use talc-free products, like cornstarch-based products and products that are labeled as "talc-free."

Mesothelioma is thankfully is not common, but The Doctors share the symptoms of this rare type of cancer, which may include:

  • Dry cough or wheezing
  • Shortness of breath (dyspnea)
  • Respiratory complications
  • Pain in the chest or abdomen
  • Fever or night sweats
  • Pleural effusion (fluid around the lungs)
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle weakness

Dr. Travis Stork acknowledges navigating which products are safe and which may potentially be harmful can difficult for the average consumer and adds, "Just like with food, we say read the ingredients, and if you know something [possibly harmful] is in that food, don't buy and don't eat... if you see talc in a product, chose one that is talc-free."

Some talc-free makeup options that will have you looking your best, without putting you at risk, include:

Physicians Formula Mineral Wear Talc-Free Pressed Powder

Honest Beauty Invisible Blurring Loose Powder

Jolie Loose Mineral Blush

Ecco Bella, FlowerColor Organic Vegan Talc-Free Pressed Powder Flawless Finishing Powder

SHANY Hydrating Face Primer

Smashbox Studio Skin Full Coverage 24 Hour Foundation

bareMinerals Matte Foundation

RMS Beauty Un Cover-Up Cream Foundation

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