Are You Tanning Your Way to Cancer?

More than 8,500 people get diagnosed with skin cancer daily, making it the most common types of cancer in the U.S.! One 45-year-old mom named Mags spent too much time worshiping the sun and tanning beds, until her doc discovered pre-cancerous cells. Next, she underwent a painful 28-day treatment to remove the cells. 

Watch: Dr. Travis's Cancer Health Scare

Documenting her day-by-day journey on Facebook, Mags used the medical creams meant to burn off those pre-cancerous cells from her face and body. The pictures show a quick transformation as her skin turns bright red.  Plastic surgeon Dr. Andrew Ordon says, "What this is, is a sequential full-face chemical peel It's similar to what we do in the office for wrinkles." As far as the pain goes, Mags writes on her Facebook post  "The skin is so tight, I'm finding it hard to open my mouth." 

OB/GYN Dr. Nita Landry says, "People don't realize that when you go into those tanning beds that can really increase your chances of getting a melanoma." Tanning facilities are now required to put warnings on their beds alerting people that it may be hazardous to your health. 

ER Physician Dr. Travis Stork shares, "I think the biggest thing I've learned when it comes to skin and prevention over the last almost decade of hosting the show is that yes, you get a temporary benefit from being outside in the sun in terms of that little bit of tan. And yeah, you may look good when you go out on the town that night, but the long-term risk of skin cancer, not to mention all the wrinkly dry skin you're going to have later in life, is just not worth it."

Watch: Can a Black Tongue Mean Melanoma? 

We hope these images are a turning point, especially for young kids, to think twice before spending hours in the sun unprotected. It truly is hazardous to your health. 

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