Woman’s Severe Uterine Bleeding and Knee Pain

Joan, 44, says she has been suffering from severe, chronic bleeding from her uterus for the past two years. Possibly resulting from a hormonal imbalance and polyps within the uterus, Joan’s prolonged, excessive bleeding has resulted in her becoming anemic and experiencing frequent bouts of dizziness. Consequently, Joan says she has fallen numerous times and has injured her right knee, making it difficult for her to walk. She reached out to The Doctors for help.

The Doctors call in the “IV League,” a team of experts in their fields who tackle the most complicated medical cases.

OB-GYN Dr. Thais Aliabadi explains that although Joan will require surgery to correct her partially torn patellar tendon, torn ligament and dislocated knee cap, the team first needs to get Joan’s bleeding under control to avoid having to perform a blood transfusion. She recommends removing Joan’s uterine polyps and performing an endometrial ablation, in which saline is pumped into the uterus, heated and circulated to remove the lining of the uterus and effectively stop the bleeding.

Watch as Dr. Aliabadi performs the ablation procedure. Plus, see how orthopedic surgeon Dr. Derek Dee fixes the damage to Joan’s knee.
The following video contains footage from live surgical procedures. Viewer discretion is advised.

 

Dr. Dee explains that Joan required two procedures to correct the damage to her knee: a direct repair to reattach and stabilize the patella and a tendon graft to replace her torn ligament. He says he was able to use donor tissue for both procedures. After a few weeks of physical therapy, Joan should regain her motion and strength.

"I'm feeling great right now," Joan says. She explains that she stopped bleeding the day after the ablation surgery and has noticed an increase in her energy levels as a result. "I cannot say how happy I am," she adds.

 

Related:

Please help keep the community civil. The Doctors moderates this forum and all comments must follow TheDoctorsTV.com Community Guidelines and New Terms of Use . The Doctors reserves the right to use the comments you submit in whole or in part, and to use the commenter’s name and location, in any medium. Note that DISQUS operates this forum and you must log-in or register with DISQUS to participate.