Breaking Medical News; Day-by-Day Health Mistakes
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Hepatitis C Breakthrough
A new pill could help cure the more than 3.2 million people in the U.S. who are infected with hepatitis C, a virus that can cause a chronic infection, leading to liver disease, and sometimes, liver cancer. It’s the No. 1 blood-borne infection in the United States.

"The earlier you can rid a patient of hepatitis C, the better, because the longer that infection exists within the body and liver, the more likely you’re developing liver damage,” ER physician Dr. Travis Stork explains.

But at $1,000 a pill, the new treatment could cost $84,000 for a 12-week regimen, making it inaccessible for many patients.

“From the patient’s perspective, this is a perfect example of technology and advances versus access,” says OB/GYN Dr. Jennifer Ashton. “It’s great that this technology exists and that the results are so positive, but does someone have access to it? If not, you could say, ‘What’s the point?’”


Dr. Tram Tran, who was involved in trials of the drug, explains how it works.


Dr. Travis asks why the pills are so expensive.


Dr. David Magnus discusses how medication is priced in the U.S.

 

Allergy Mistakes

It's that time of year — when many people are sniffing and sneezing because of seasonal allergies. Learn how to find out what you're allergic to, and how to treat the annoying symptoms.

Know When to Hold ‘Em
A gambler who lost $500,000 at a Las Vegas casino is suing the casino, saying the establishment shouldn’t have allowed him to continue placing bets because he was too drunk. The Doctors discuss self-responsibility and the dangers of alcohol.

Funeral Selfies?
Should people take “selfies” at a funeral? Is it a way to mourn and seek support from friends and family, or is it an inappropriate trend that should die quickly? The Doctors weigh in on “corpsies.”

Mark Your Calendars
The Doctors reveal the biggest mistakes you’re likely to make on each day of the week — and how to avoid them.

“You only have one life, so enjoy each and every day of the week,” Dr. Travis says.


Did you manage your stress over the weekend? If not, you could be at risk for a fatal heart attack.


Find out the best days to start a diet, go grocery shopping and schedule a doctor’s appointment.


Got the Sunday blues? Learn why you shouldn’t stress out and how you should spend your Sunday.  

• Get the recipe for The Doctors' Stress-Blaster Smoothie.

More Than "Just a Skin Condition"
Elaine and Gabe’s 2-year-old daughter, Lina, wakes up every couple of hours crying and scratching her dry skin until it bleeds and blisters. Lina has had severe eczema since she was 3 months old. It has spread from her arms to her legs and is starting to spread toward her face.


“It hurts my heart because I would rather be the one to be experiencing that pain. She’s too little to experience that,” Elaine says. “For her to constantly rip her skin away and see the blood on the sheets, that hurts my heart.”

Elaine says she and her husband have tried many different treatments to try to help their daughter. “I’m feeling hopeless at this point,” she says.

Dermatologist Dr. Howard Liu joins The Doctors and explains that eczema is a hypersensitivity of the immune system, which attacks the skin. The skin becomes dry, inflamed and itchy, so the natural reaction is to scratch, which causes more inflammation, leading to a vicious cycle. Eczema can be caused by genetics and is triggered by exposure to certain foods, clothing and substances in the environment. There is no cure, but the condition can usually be controlled with topical creams and lifestyle changes.

“A lot of people say, ‘Oh, it’s just a skin condition,’ but it’s so much more than that,” Dr. Travis says.

The Doctors send Lina to Dr. Liu for a consultation.

Dr. Liu explains the treatment options and how to minimize triggers.

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