Robin Quivers’ Cancer Scare; Boy with Butterfly Skin
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The Vegucation of Robin: How Real Food Saved My Life


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Robin Quivers' Health Battle
You might know her best as radio shock jock Howard Stern’s softer side, but behind the laughs, radio host Robin Quivers has been fighting a silent battle.

In May 2012, Robin was diagnosed with endometrial cancer. She endured 12 hours of surgery to remove a tumor the size of a grapefruit that was blocking her urethra. She also underwent six weeks of radiation, 12 weeks of chemotherapy and another operation in January 2013.

"I didn't believe it," Robin says. "I have a great ability to go into denial. So they kept saying, 'You have cancer,' but I really couldn't believe it."

Now, five months cancer-free, Robin maintains the strict vegan diet she's followed since 2007. She credits her healthy diet with helping her bounce back from the surgeries and cancer treatments.

Family medicine physician and clinical sexologist Dr. Rachael Ross heads into the kitchen to cook up a few of Robin's favorite holiday vegan recipes  from her new book The Vegucation of Robin: How Real Food Saved My Life. Robin shows Dr. Rachael how to cut down on all those extra calories from fat, flour and salt without giving up her holiday favorites!

• From Robin's first Thanksgiving as a vegan, try Candied Sweet Potatoes with Apples.

• One of the most disliked vegetables gets a tasty redo: Brussels Sprouts with Fresh Rosemary

• Gluten-free stuffing? It's possible with Robin's Wild Rice and Bread Stuffing

• For a more nutritious alternative to traditional mashed potatoes, try Mashed Potatoes with Wild Mushroom Gravy. 

• Who doesn't love pie? Especially when it's Pumpkin Pie with Pecan Crust

The Doctors Exclusive: Boy with Butterfly Skin
It’s been labeled the worst disease you’ve never heard of. In a The Doctors house call you’ll never forget, pediatrician Dr. Jim Sears meets John Hudson Dilgen, an 11-year-old boy living with epidermolysis bullosa, a terminal skin disease that results in extremely fragile skin that blisters and tears at the slightest touch.

Epidermolysis bullosa, or EB, is an inherited disease passed through a recessive gene in both parents. There are three main types: epidermolysis bullosa simplex, dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and junctional epidermolysis bullosa. The disease is very rare, affecting only one in every 20,000 to 50,000 children. Dr. Sears explains that normally, the two skin layers — the dermis and the epidermis — are fused together with proteins. However, in people with EB simplex — like John Hudson — the proteins are missing, resulting in skin layers that slide and are easily damaged. The condition is very painful. John Hudson has to be very careful, even when walking, as any small force can hurt him and cause a wound. 

“I think, why in life would I have to be tortured like this, when everybody else has happy lives?” John Hudson says. “I don’t understand it.”

Learn more about EB and how you can help.

Could You Survive a Crash Landing?
Are you as prepared to fly as you should be?  The Doctors  cameras were rolling on a recent shoot with Dr. Sears, who learned a lesson in preparedness when everyone's worst travel nightmare became his reality.

Recently, Dr. Sears took a flight that could have ended in disaster. As smoke filled the cabin, the airplane began to shake violently, and oxygen masks dropped from the ceiling. Dr. Sears and his camera crew were forced to brace themselves for impact and exit the plane via an evacuation slide.

Being prepared, both mentally and physically, is the key to surviving a plane crash. See Dr. Sears' harrowing plane ride, and get tips on how to have a safe and happy landing.

Is Alcohol Making You Ugly?
Would you stop drinking if you found out it might make you less attractive or look older than you actually are? The Doctors answer questions about alcohol consumption and aging. How many glasses of alcohol a week is too much?

The Doctors check out an iPad app called "The Drinking Mirror," that shows you how alcohol can speed up the aging process!

Dr. Ross explains which is worse for your health : alcohol or marijuana.

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