Breaking News, Shocking Household Toxins and New Age-Defying Treatment
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From toxic chemicals in driveways to dangerous fumes in deodorants, The Doctors show you how to keep your family safe and informed! Then, could the latest age-defying treatment put Botox out of business? Plus, what you need to know about seizures.

Dog Sniffs Out Abusive Baby Sitter
Ben and Hope thought it was strange when their dog barked, growled and acted aggressively when the woman who baby-sat their 7-month-old son, Finn, arrived at their house. They decided to hide a cell phone in the house so they could record what was going on while they were at work. Hope returned from work and was shocked when she listened to the recording.

"She called me at work, and she said, 'Come home, now. We have a problem,'" Ben recalls.


Ben and Hope join The Doctors to share their story. 


Listen to the cell phone recording, and get tips for finding a trustworthy caregiver.

Big Mac a Day?
Dennis, who is 64 years old, eats at least one Big Mac every day and estimates he has eaten 12,000 of the burgers over the past 30 years. But, he isn't overweight and says he feels healthy.

"Your outside look does not mean what's happening on the inside," says physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist Dr. Ian Smith. "We're also worried about what's happening internally."


"I don't think I look like the typical Mac-aholic," Dennis says.


The Doctors reveal Dennis' blood test results and offer suggestions for how he can improve his diet.

 


Could Your Driveway Be Toxic?
You might want to think twice before you let your kids play basketball or hopscotch in your driveway or the neighborhood park.

A Baylor University study has found that people who live near pavement sealed with coal tar, often used on parking lots and driveways, might have as much as a 38 percent increased chance of developing cancer during their lifetimes.

You can be exposed to the potential toxins when vehicle and foot traffic breaks down the sealant into dust particles, which are released into the air and tracked into the house.

It can be difficult to tell the difference between coal tar and asphalt, which is safe. E.R. physician Dr. Travis Stork demonstrates a test you can do at home to determine if your driveway is sealed with coal tar.


Spray Deodorant
Dangers

Sybil's 16-year-old son, Talon, wants to smell nice for the ladies. He prefers spray deodorant because it's easy to use.

But Sybil is worried that the spray could cause skin irritation, breathing problems and even heart problems, and wants to help Talon find an alternative.

"Chicks don't dig stink," she says.

Dr. Travis explains the risks of using spray deodorants and other aerosols, which use butane gas as a propellant.

Another option? Make your own deodorant at home.


Botox Alternative?

Barbara has wanted to reduce the appearance of her deep forehead wrinkles since she turned 40, but she's been afraid of getting fillers that might make her face look like it was frozen.

Dermatologist Dr. Howard Liu explains that some facial rejuvenations can look unnatural when the upper face is too frozen, and the lower face is out of proportion with too much filling. He says there's also the risk of a blue discoloration when some fillers are injected too close to the surface of the skin.

Dr. Liu treats Barbara with a new filler, called Belotero, which claims to reduce wrinkles while allowing natural movement of facial muscles.


Watch as Dr. Liu injects Barbara's forehead with filler to help reduce her wrinkles.


Get a close-up look at Barbara's forehead after the procedure.

 

Tailgating Tips

The Doctors offer tips for how to pack your cooler for fall football tailgating to keep your food the right temperature and  your friends and family from getting sick.

Recognizing a Seizure
Dr. Freda Lewis-Hall, Pfizer's chief medical officer, joins The Doctors to discuss different types of seizures and what to do when someone you know has one.

"All of our brain function depends on our nerve cells talking to each other through chemical and electrical activity," she explains. "If there's a surge in that activity or a break in it, that's a seizure."


 

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OAD 9/20/13

 






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