Ask Our Doctors: Celebrity Edition!
20110311 Widescreen

The Doctors takes on Hollywood's most pressing health questions.

Jon Lovitz Reaches Out

Psoriasis
Comedian Jon Lovitz has been battling psoriasis for more than a decade. Psoriasis is a skin disease where overactive T-Cells attack healthy skin cells causing skin to rejuvenate too quickly, resulting in painful and unsightly skin patches. While psoriasis is not a contagious condition, those suffering from it must seek medical attention, as it can develop into a debilitating state of chronic itching and bleeding. There are a number of treatments, including prescription creams and laser procedures, depending on severity.

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"If you have it, it's the most miserable thing ever," Jon says. "It's horrible, and you're constantly dealing with it and itching. You wake up bleeding, and it's just a mess."

Jon uses humor to deal with the disease and let others know that they're not alone. Watch his PSA created for seriousaboutpsoriasis.com, and learn more about the condition that affects 125 million people worldwide.

 Hair Loss
"I've been losing my hair for a while, and I was wondering if there's stuff I can do?" Jon asks.

While baldness is primarily determined by genetics, there are steps you can take to improve the quality of your hair and delay hair loss. E.R. physician Dr. Travis Stork says it's all about eating right and staying active.

Since hair is made of protein, eating protein-rich foods, as well as foods high in iron and zinc, will help keep hair follicles healthy. Lean red meats and green leafy vegetables are great sources for these nutrients.

Exercising regularly stimulates circulation and blood flow, which is also stimulates growth. Jon stays active by playing tennis several times per week but says, "If you don't eat right, the exercise doesn't matter."

Plastic surgeon Dr. Drew Ordon suggests using over-the-counter hair products to sustain thickness and slow hair loss, and discusses the option of hair plugs. "Micro plugs have come a long way," he says. "There's some great stuff being done out there."

More hair restoration options


Mo'Nique Asks about Exercise and Her Cycle

Oscar-winning actress and comedian Mo'Nique is curious about the safety of high-impact exercise while on her menstrual cycle.

"The answer is, you've got to go with the flow" OB/GYN Dr. Lisa Masterson says. "Exercise is beneficial and can help with cramps and lighten your period. Plus, it releases endorphins, which helps you feel better and lessons the symptoms of mood swings and PMS."

 • Ease PMS symptoms with a smoothie!


Rita Wilson Wonders about Eye Twitches

Actress and producer Rita Wilson is curious about sudden and involuntary eye twitches. Dr. Travis says that eyelid spasms are normally related to stress, lack of sleep or consuming too much caffeine and alcohol.

The best way to prevent eye spasms is to exercise to reduce stress, improve your sleep schedule and cut down on caffeine and alcohol. If the spasms don't let up, visit your doctor. If they are benign, Dr. Ordon says that Botox can help by stabilizing the orbicularis oculi, which is the muscle in the eye that is spasming.

Blair Underwood's Six-Pack

Blair Underwood, star of The Event,  asks The Doctors how he can keep his fit physique as he ages.

Hollywood's most wanted body parts!


Cheryl Hines on Altitude Sickness

While on a ski trip in the mountains, Curb Your Enthusiasm star Cheryl Hines asks The Doctors why some people feel sick at high altitudes.

"Our bodies are stable until about 6,500 feet; after that point, you may get symptoms that occur from not getting enough oxygen in the body, which affects every single organ," Dr. Ordon says. "You may have nausea and vomiting, which are basic feelings of going to high altitudes."

The key to managing high-altitude-related symptoms is preparation. Get in shape and take a few days of rest before physical activity, so your body can adjust to the altitude, and be sure to stay hydrated.

If you experience confusion and difficulty breathing, it could mean high altitude pulmonary edema, which requires a trip to the emergency room for oxygen. If you know you're sensitive to high altitudes, talk to your doctor about what you can do to prevent sickness.


Naomi Judd Opens Up

Fighting Fatigue
Country music icon Naomi Judd asks The Doctors for tips on how to keep her energy levels up while on tour.

Dr. Travis advises removing refined grains from your diet like white bread and rice, and star eating whole grains found in whole wheat bread, brown rice and quinoa. Nuts are also a key energy-boosting food, as they are high in magnesium, a nutrient that many people with low energy lack.

Add more whole grains to your diet!

Staying hydrated and active are also key aspects of maintaining energy levels, as well as getting enough rest. The best way to feel rested is to schedule a consistent bedtime and wake-up time, so your body can adjust.

The Doctors and USA Weekend

The Doctors have an exciting partnership with USA Weekend magazine as exclusive medical contributors. Check out their HealthSmart column!

Learn which local newspapers feature USA Weekend and
read more features from the HealthSmart column.

Hepatitis C
While working as an ICU nurse in 1991, Naomi was diagnosed with Hepatitis C, a blood-borne virus that leads to inflammation of the liver. "Hepatitis C is going to kill four-times more Americans than AIDS will in the next decade, and no one knows about it," she says.

Naomi has been cured of Hepatitis C and has resumed touring, but she continues to raise awareness about the disease. Her mission is to squash the stigma that it is only contracted by illegal intravenous drug use. 

"I hate the stigma," Naomi says. "I've never done IV drugs and have been monogamous for 30 years. So many people get organ transplants and blood transfusions, and I want to give a shout out to all the folks out there with hepatitis C. Please be proactive and aggressive with your doctors to get the treatment you need."

• Check out Naomi's new docu-series, The Judds, premiering April 10 on OWN.


Staying Healthy at Home



Chandra Wilson asks "How can I get my kid to eat vegetables?


Why we all need to drink more milk


Joan Lunden's concerns about earaches.


 


More benefits of milk.
• Get Dr. Sears' recipes for Confetti Veggie Pancakes, Squash Fries and Chocolate Zucchini Cupcakes!

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